bad girls do it well Cristy, 23, New York City. Hong Kong-Chinese American womanist.
This blog is a collection of the personal, the pretty, and the sociopolitical.
Trigger warning for rape/sexual assault, trans/misogyny, racism, and anti-Blackness.
You can message me via my ask box.

staticrougecurves:

staticrougecurves:

This whole outfit screams Forever21 +

Photo Credit: KW Photography Kevin Wilford

Location: Aruba :)

Wow, the notes!!

(via petitsirena)

grimelords:

Making out with a girl for the first time is the coolest thing and the second coolest thing is driving home and getting aware of all the parts of your face where she was and tasting her lip balm on your lips. The third coolest thing is outer space.

(via catracism)

deluxvivens:

poc-creators:

coloroutsidethelinesfilm:

Check out the first 5 minutes of Color Outside the Lines: A Tattoo Documentary. This clip introduces us all to Jacci Gresham, the mother of black tattoo culture.

www.cotlfilm.com

This is on my to get list. 

they have a bunch of related vids on their youtube channel.

my thoughts:

1. if i was ever going to get a tattoo? i’d go to nola to have that woman do it. part of the reason i’ve never gotten a tattoo is that the almost entirely white tattoo artist scene that i have encountered gives me zero confidence that they could do something appropriate for my skin color.

2. this doc will not get any of the respect it deserves but ‘trend watchers’ will fall over themselves jacking the stuff these artists come up with for mainstream consumption.

(Source: artemusjenkins.com, via moo-ahyou)

I’m interested in a POC, QTPOC, poor and working class, crip and disabled, womxn centered, love-based revolution. To be more specific, I want to participate in a community that de-prioritizes whiteness, patriarchy and masculinity, celebrity, cis folk, and other forms of privilege when discussing who we are and how we want to exist with each other. I want to see a QTPOC culture that recognizes how we recreate hierarchy and privilege and works to reject those hierarchies and privileges when they are offered to us. We cannot practice accountability as a community if we cannot practice it within our individual lives. Even if we cannot stop people in positions of great political and cultural power from doing the oppressive things they have been doing for centuries, we can create and uphold an alternative model.

We have an abundance of intellectual, artistic, familial, romantic, psychological, medicinal, and economic resources; we do not need systems that emerge from this country’s white supremacist heritage to survive. Further, we need to stop living in opposition to whiteness when we can be living for the empowerment and survival of each other. We can take care of each other if we choose; but, when we do it, it needs to be rooted in love, self-reflection, and generosity. So, this year, when you critique U.S. imperialism on July 4th, dedicate some of that energy to critiquing and shifting the ways you contribute to and benefit from that imperialism by creating new practices, rituals, and systems for intra-community accountability and resilience.

Jezebel Delilah X, De-Centering Whiteness Through Radical Accountability in QTPOC Community (via ethiopienne)
milklace:

i havent even watched this show (yet)

milklace:

i havent even watched this show (yet)

(via youkaizakari)

As often as Kanye West talks about the state of his mental health, one would think that we’d be having a national conversation on mental health–kind of like the way we had a wave of conversations about domestic violence in the wake of the Chris Brown-Rihanna incident. Yet, in the four years since Kanye began talking openly about the depression related to the death of his mother and the dissolution of his romantic relationship with longtime paramour Alexis Phifer, the conversations have continued to be one-sided.

A search for “Kanye West and Depression” brings up surprisingly few articles and discussions. There’s a sterile AP article describing his initial comments, Cord Jefferson advising Kanye to go to a therapist on The Root, an MTV news article on his path to recovery, and Tom Breihan in the Village Voice distilling 808′s and Heartbreak down to “emo bellyaching” and a “album-length tantrum at his ex.” While Bassey Ikpi later argued to have some compassion for Kanye, it was one small plea in a sea of indifference and condemnation.

After four years of being open about pain and vulnerability, I’m starting to wonder if society will ever really hear him.


The R’s editor/owner Latoya Peterson is posting about mental health—in pop culture and in daily lives—all this week. Check out her analysis on Kanye West’ 808’s and Heartbreak and how badly pop/media culture handled his discussing his mental health on the album on the R today.  (via racialicious)

Just wanted to highlight this bit:

the only acceptable emotion for Black men to publicly express and still retain their masculinity is rage.

This reminds me of Tricky back in the 90s - he said in a documentary once that whenever he did photo shoots for magazine covers they wanted him to look angry and make rage faces and look tough. But his music wasn’t really about that, it was about feeling sad and confused a lot of the time. But nobody wanted to see that, they said he was more marketable as an angry black man.

(via rubyvroom)

this actually, this actually really means a lot to me right. when I first heard that album, it connected with me on a primal level, it’s my favorite kanye album, I think it’s a perfect album and I’ve never understood why people shit on it so much. I still hope that time will tell and and people will come to see it for what it is.

(via thewhitemankilledthetruth)

(via moo-ahyou)

abigaildonaldson:

Model of the Moment: Issa Lish @ Muse

The modeling world loves unusual beauty, so it’s no wonder that Issa Lish has taken it by storm.
The 18-year-old half-Mexican, half-Japanese model was discovered while working in her father’s sushi restaurant in Mexico City. Lish’s mother had grounded her for slacking off in school, and working in the restaurant for the whole summer was her punishment. Then—as these stories always go—a model scout noticed the alienesque teen and asked if she had considered modeling.
"I was just like, ‘No, not really,’ Lish told WWD. “You hear so many stories about [sex trafficking] and slavery and people buying girls, especially in Mexico City, and I was just like, ‘No, I’m not interested; I don’t know anything about fashion.’”
But the scout was persistent, visiting the restaurant for several weeks before Liss eventually caved and signed with her mother agency, Wanted Model Management. Since then, success has come unusually fast for Lish, who opened Anna Sui’s fall show, covered the April issue of Vogue Italia shot by Steven Meisel, and now the newbie can be seen starring in the fall Balmain campaign alongside the likes of Cara Delevigne and Jourdan Dunn.
"I know I’m not the typical beauty model … In school, I wasn’t the popular, pretty girl. I never said I wanted to be a model. My goal in life was never to be a model."
So it goes.

abigaildonaldson:

Model of the Moment: Issa Lish @ Muse

The modeling world loves unusual beauty, so it’s no wonder that Issa Lish has taken it by storm.

The 18-year-old half-Mexican, half-Japanese model was discovered while working in her father’s sushi restaurant in Mexico City. Lish’s mother had grounded her for slacking off in school, and working in the restaurant for the whole summer was her punishment. Then—as these stories always go—a model scout noticed the alienesque teen and asked if she had considered modeling.

"I was just like, ‘No, not really,’ Lish told WWD. “You hear so many stories about [sex trafficking] and slavery and people buying girls, especially in Mexico City, and I was just like, ‘No, I’m not interested; I don’t know anything about fashion.’”

But the scout was persistent, visiting the restaurant for several weeks before Liss eventually caved and signed with her mother agency, Wanted Model Management. Since then, success has come unusually fast for Lish, who opened Anna Sui’s fall show, covered the April issue of Vogue Italia shot by Steven Meisel, and now the newbie can be seen starring in the fall Balmain campaign alongside the likes of Cara Delevigne and Jourdan Dunn.

"I know I’m not the typical beauty model … In school, I wasn’t the popular, pretty girl. I never said I wanted to be a model. My goal in life was never to be a model."

So it goes.

(via cmao)

hotdadcalendar:

I’m actually concerned for boys who complain about how different girls look without makeup. Like did you think eyeshadow permanently alters a girls eyelid? Are you frightened when people change clothes

(via homoarigato)

grapeson:

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet the 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed a Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

Brilliant teenage GIRLS, specifically.

grapeson:

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet the 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed a Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

Brilliant teenage GIRLS, specifically.

(via bravenewgirls)

Queer Muslim Masterpost

strawberreli:

This post pretty much came about because I was asked if I had resources for Muslims who were discovering or newly coming to terms with their sexuality. I didn’t, and the poor advice I had to offer was … poor. So, I pulled up a few of the blogs I followed that are targeted towards queer Muslims, and put together this little post for you!

Queer Muslim Blogs:

Queer Muslim 101:

A good thing to remember is to avoid the self-hatred phase, if you can. Focus on loving yourself, and realising that Allah made you just the way you are, and that you are loved. If this phase is unavoidable, here are some helpful sites:

If you are a student and would like to get Faisal Alam to speak at your uni, or to see if he is coming to your uni soon, click here.

If you would like to attend Faisal Alam’s 2013 Retreat for Queer Muslims and their partners, here is the facebook event, and here is more info. Register for the retreat here.

If you are from Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or India and want to share your experiences (anonymously), please click here.

If you can spare some funds, help navigatethestream, a queer Muslim, become an Imam to help the Muslim LGBT* community!

Lastly, here is a link if you are NOT a queer Muslim, but want to be a good ALLY! (And here is another on how NOT to be a saviour!)

Muslim-Queer-Friendly Blogs:

Read More

fritokal:

gradientlair:

Three fabulous Black ballerinas, Ashley Murphy, Ebony Williams and Misty Copeland are on the cover of Pointe for June/July 2014. Stunning cover. They’re so beautiful. I’ve never bought a ballet magazine but I want a copy of this to read their story and to keep. ❤
Oh and their brown pointe shoes. IMPORTANT. 


Not just brown but look at the three women and their shoes. The tones of the shoes match their skin tones of their legs. Those aren’t just brown - those are shoes made for the different shades of brown!

fritokal:

gradientlair:

Three fabulous Black ballerinas, Ashley Murphy, Ebony Williams and Misty Copeland are on the cover of Pointe for June/July 2014. Stunning cover. They’re so beautiful. I’ve never bought a ballet magazine but I want a copy of this to read their story and to keep. 

Oh and their brown pointe shoes. IMPORTANT. 

Not just brown but look at the three women and their shoes. The tones of the shoes match their skin tones of their legs. Those aren’t just brown - those are shoes made for the different shades of brown!

(via clickbreatheclick)

http://bladetheroosterteethfanguy.tumblr.com/post/77156670627/a-woman-has-twins-and-gives-them-up-for

bladetheroosterteethfanguy:

a woman has twins and gives them up for adoption

one of them goes to a family in egypt and is named amal the other goes to a family in spain they name him juan

years later juan sends a picture of himself to his birth mother. upon receiving the picture she tells her husband that she wishes she also had a picture of amal

he responds “theyre twins if youve seen juan youve seen amal”

colorfulcuties:

goshorter:

@jpsocalol. What a great change on this client

❤

colorfulcuties:

goshorter:

@jpsocalol. What a great change on this client

(via socialistkittens)

You gotta keep the step. You gotta limber up. You gotta loosen what you bolted down. You gotta use all you got. We know you’re tired, tired and scared. Happens to everyone, okay? Just don’t let your feet stop.
Haruki Murakami, Dance Dance Dance (via whyallcaps)

(Source: stxxz.us, via commovente)

colorfulcuties:

seafoamtides:

I was reading an article the other day called “What Pastel Hair Means for Women of Color" and it stuck so close to home with me, because I have always dyed my hair. Recently though, I have seen the pastel trend and although I tried it a year ago (left picture) it’s something that as a Latinx is very "out of the box" to do. There were scoldings from both sides of the family, and snide comments of how my hair or skin tone were not for that shade. I kept that color for about 4 months, until I had a job in my uni that called for "professional" hair colors. Now that I’m a college junior, I said fuck it and dyed my bangs blue/green because I feel like I am not myself if my hair does not express an artistic part of me. 

I am Diana, 21, Animation Major at Tecnologico de Monterrey. I love to dye my hair and say fuck it to those who think it’s not for latinxs. 

Submission ❤