bad girls do it well Cristy, 23, New York City. Hong Kong-Chinese American womanist.
This blog is a collection of the personal, the pretty, and the sociopolitical.
Trigger warning for rape/sexual assault, trans/misogyny, racism, and anti-Blackness.
You can message me via my ask box.
jessehimself:

atane:

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.
The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

been my twitter background for ages

jessehimself:

atane:

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.

The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

been my twitter background for ages

(via vivanlosancestros)

Men fear witches because they take their power from the earth without poisoning the soil.
(via ycnan)

(Source: howitzerliterarysociety, via catharticecstvsy)

everythingrises:


Idris Elba with Lucy at the August 25, 2014 Emmys afterparty 

Luther x Elementary crossover plsssssss

everythingrises:

Idris Elba with Lucy at the August 25, 2014 Emmys afterparty

Luther x Elementary crossover plsssssss

(Source: fyeahlucyliu)

ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

(via solaceames)

A racist society will give you a racist science.

R. M. Young (1987). Racist society, racist science. In D. Gill & L. Levidow (Eds.) Anti-racist science teaching (pp. 16-42). London: Free Association Books. (via homoarigato)

remember when i posted about how science can be oppressive and i got hate mail and hundreds of notes of people calling me stupid

yeah that was fun 

(via booarenotboo)

Remember that time when they made up a disease for black ppl when we didnt wanna be stuck as slaves?

Remember when they operated on black women with no anesthesia to get modern gynecological surgical procedures?

Remember when they sterilized poor woc without consent to keep us from ‘creating more undesirables’?

Remember when the government allowed Black men to go untreated with Syphilis even after a cure was discovered?

Remember when minority heavy areas in cities were sprayed with radioactive material to ‘test’ how America could handle a nuclear fallout?

Oh, you dont? Because I do…

Go look it up. Every single one was done by a white supremacist nation called America.

FOR SCIENCE!

(via sourcedumal)

Don’t forget that in 1975 about 35% of Puerto Rican Women were sterilized without their consent by the US government 

(via thisisnotlatino)

1. A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History by Nicholas Wade (Published 2014)

"Right now, it’s undeniable that Wade’s work is the most influential work of scientific racism circulating today. His argument is that racial groups have genetic predispositions to certain kinds of mental skills, some of which evolved only over the past few hundred years. As a result, some races are more creative or intelligent than others. The Chinese, he argues, are more prone to obedience, while people from tribal societies in Africa are impulsive and quick to consume everything they have. Meanwhile, Europeans are good at becoming prosperous due to their thoughtful, forward-thinking natures.

2. The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life, by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray (Published 1994)

"In this incredibly influential work of economics and sociology, researchers Herrnstein and Murray argue that class differences between whites and blacks in America can be traced back to differences in IQ. Blacks, they write, are simply not as intelligent as whites (and, to a certain extent, Asians — though mostly they’re talking just about blacks and whites). Because many studies show that IQ is a very strong indicator of economic success, they believe that IQ differences are at the root of racial differences. They use "scientific" data about IQ scores to dismiss the idea that political inequalities and the history of slavery in the U.S. are causes of racial inequality."

3.  “Why Are Black Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women?” By: Satoshi Kanazawa (Published 2011)

"Dr Kanazawa, a lecturer at the London School of Economics, has published findings based on a survey of white, Asian, black and native American men and women who were asked to rate each other’s attractiveness based on photographs.

Nor does he explore the fact that the research on which he bases his conclusion was conducted in America where European ideals of beauty dominate.”

***Satoshi Kanazawa has been the only recipient on this list dismissed for his work, could it be because he is an Asian man?***

In response to ongoing controversy over views such as that African countries suffer chronic poverty and illness because their people have lower IQs and that black women are “objectively less attractive” than other races, he was dismissed from writing for Psychology Today.

(via impoi)

(Source: livelaughawesome, via vivanlosancestros)

nonmodernist:

bigbangpress:

Here’s a picture from our first book, A Hero at the End of the World, written by Erin Claiborne (eleveninches) and illustrated by Jade Liebes (hydrae). The two guys in this photo are Ewan Mao and his former best friend Oliver Abrams.

As a teenager, Ewan was prophesied to save Britain from an evil tyrant — but chickened out at the last moment. Instead, his best friend Oliver ended up defeating the villain. Five years later, Oliver is a national hero while Ewan works at a coffee shop and still lives with his parents. But the two friends are unwillingly reunited when a magical cult targets Ewan in a plot to end the world.

A Hero at the End of the World is a hilarious and gripping combination of YA fantasy adventure, queer romance, and political satire. It will be published by Big Bang Press on November 11, and you can find out more on our website!

fantasy adventure, queer romance, and political satire - this book is everything i’ve ever wanted in my YA fantasy loving heart

(via richincolor)

http://fatwasandfanboys.tumblr.com/post/77888024908/the-consumption-of-hijab-a-contrition-the

fatwasandfanboys:

the consumption of hijab

image

(a) contrition— the shame and regret associated with not wearing the hijab sometimes makes me feel like I have to apologize

(b) comfort— depending on the time, place and space, the hijab can feel like a second skin, a security blanket, a crutch or an invisibility cloak

image

(c) convenience— the hijab sometimes eliminates the obligation of having to do my hair

(d) curtain— i don’t have to see anyone sitting to the left or right of me unless i make the effort

(e) conjunction— when i encounter a woman on the bus and she is wearing a hijab, we move together in synchronicity until one of us gets off the bus

(f) confinement— the hijab effectively becomes a jailhouse when i’m asked to put it on if the cost of not wearing it is humiliation for someone else

image

(g) collusion— when my sisters and i implicitly lie to elders in the community by never showing them the versions of ourselves that don’t wear the hijab

(h) continuity— i’ve gotten myself into a situation where a group outside of the community only knows me as someone who wears a hijab and there’s no turning back

(i) conflation— i am the hijab, i am a support system for the hijab, i don’t know where the hijab starts and where i begin  

image

(j) congeniality— if i am not wearing the hijab, i might be perceived as unfriendly, unapproachable or uppity to young women who wear the hijab and consider me one of them

(k) clueless— the fugue of waking up with the hijab on and not knowing how it got there, who i am or what’s happening   

(l) control— my super power is determining how i want my sexuality to be communicated

image

(m) chameleon— i can blend in with other hijabs and other faces that look like mine

(n) coalesce— i can be one giant hijab on one giant face with other hijabs and other faces

(o) captive— i am being held hostage at a memorial service or an exorcism or men are in the living room and i’m in the kitchen

(p) cold— it’s winter and my ears are cold

image

(q) coil— if i don’t wear a hijab, i could mess up the curl pattern of the hair my mother and mother’s mother gave me, cursing a generation of women with straight hair

(r) conspicuous— the hijab can make me stand and stick out loudly, boldly  

(s) contagion— i can reduce the spread of germs by not having to shake hands with, hug or hold a man

image

(t) colossal— i can feel like a massive structure   

(u) convince— people can see anyone they want to see, even someone more beautiful 

(v) contrivance— the hijab is artifice and you know when i am telling you the truth because i’m not wearing it

(w) costume— wearing the hijab is like performing dragimage

(x) conflict— i need to move to a new city where very few know my name and and nobody knows me as somebody with many contradictory and conflicting parts

(y) cost — my worth fluctuates like the stock market; sometimes i feel expensive and sometimes i feel free   

(z) contraband—  i’m suspicious and criminal and illegal wherever women are madeimage

nevver:

Hmmm?

nevver:

Hmmm?

(via arabellesicardi)

He Was Raised by a White Mom and Didn't Think the Cops Were Out to Get Him. Until They Got Him.

dynastylnoire:

I heard his story on NPR. His mom raised him to “not see color” etc. And the cops beat  the hell out of him when they pulled him over. It took seeing him in jail beaten half to death for her to see that race matters every day.

(via solaceames)

sen mitsuji // fab4

(Source: frankoceanfanclub, via arabellesicardi)

An even bigger issue is that if people think social justice is about niceness, it means they have fundamentally misunderstood privilege. Privilege does not mean you live in a world where people are nice to you and never insult you. It means you live in a world in which you, and people like you, are given systematic advantages over other people. Being marginalised does not mean people are always nasty to you, it means you live in a world in which many aspects of the cultural, social and economic systems are stacked against people like you. Some very privileged people have had awful experiences in life, but it does not erase their privilege.

The Revolution Will Not Be Polite (via afrafemme)

Don’t tame the rage. Make noise out of it.

(via fascinasians)

(via moo-ahyou)

(Source: coalgirls, via spicyobsession)

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.


Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

(via wonderfulslumber)

(Source: sailormoonscreencaps, via moo-ahyou)

I’m in love with Park Seojoon now, help me