bad girls do it well Cristy, 23, New York City. Hong Kong-Chinese American womanist.
This blog is a collection of the personal, the pretty, and the sociopolitical.
Trigger warning for rape/sexual assault, trans/misogyny, racism, and anti-Blackness.
You can message me via my ask box.

mayakern:

seasonal fashion according to me

god i hate summer

(via transiency)

stoptellingwomentosmile:

This video was shot and edited by Dean Peterson
Dean and I got in contact a few months ago. He liked the project, I liked his work, and so we made this video that documents the process behind creating STWTS posters. 

It’s important for me to show the process behind creating these pieces. Each portrait is an actual woman who has a story, who goes through this treatment daily, who has something to say about it that deserves to be heard. 

I initially decided to portray the women as drawings instead of photographs because it was my natural inclination as a portrait painter. But also, drawing someone’s portrait makes you really look at them. You have to recognize their humanity not just physically but personally. And I hope that’s what comes across when people see these portraits in the street. 

I’m rambling. Watch the video. 
Thanks to Zahira and Koku for talking so candidly with me. 

-
TF

Carrie Mae Weems Brings Change to the Guggenheim

meowmaniaaa:

2brwngrls:

In her 30-year career, Portland-born photographer Carrie Mae Weems has collected a long succession of accolades and honors, with approximately 50 solo exhibitions around the world, honorary degrees from numerous institutions, and, most recently, a MacArthur Genius Grant. This year, Weems gets the distinctive honor of becoming the first African-American woman to have a retrospective at the Guggenheim — her first major exhibition at any New York museum, ever. It’s one of those honors that sits at an awkward intersection, both disappointing and profound. Disappointing because it has taken this long for the Guggenheim to recognize an African American’s work is such a capacity, and profound because Weems’s work in particular feels strangely appropriate in this space, at this time.

Carrie Mae Weems, "Untitled (Man and mirror)," from "Kitchen Table Series" (1990), gelatin silver print, 27 1/4 x 27 1/4 in (69.2 x 69.2 cm) (Collection of Eric and Liz Lefkofsky, promised gift to The Art Institute of Chicago) (© Carrie Mae Weems) (photo © The Art Institute of Chicago) (click to enlarge)

In the days since the debut of Weems’s exhibition (coupled with a beautifully edited catalogue from Yale University Press), there has been discussion not only about its historic significance, but also about the significance of how it’s situated within the Guggenheim itself. Curated by Kathryn E. Delmez and initially presented at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville (the Guggenheim is the final stop on a national tour), the original retrospective has been cut down extensively, with Weems’s moving exploration of Gullah culture, theSea Island Series,only excerpted, and other important works such asThe Hampton Project, which explores ties between African and Native Americans, cut out all together. And it’s true: the exhibit, split in loose chronological order between two of the museum’s Annex Level galleries, does somehow feel incomplete…

my latest article on the Carrie Mae Weems Guggenheim exhibit - check out the rest at the link!

- Z

so i saw this on saturday and i have a lot of love for cmw and a lot of feelings about the guggenheim and a lot of that is captured in this article

(via ethiopienne)

blackcontemporaryart:

Mario MooreJordan, 2012 (?)

blackcontemporaryart:

Mario Moore
Jordan, 2012 (?)

(via afropicking)

beneviolentskytreader:

"Creation"

working on a piece to go with this 

(via afropicking)

witchsona:

I’m really late for the party, but here’s my Witchsona for the witchsona week that passed long ago.I’d be less of a “herbs and magic” kinda witch, but more of a “I lure and fight magical girls in strange abstract dimensions” kinda witch, because I think those are kinda cool and I love me some magical girls. 

witchsona:

I’m really late for the party, but here’s my Witchsona for the witchsona week that passed long ago.

I’d be less of a “herbs and magic” kinda witch, but more of a “I lure and fight magical girls in strange abstract dimensions” kinda witch, because I think those are kinda cool and I love me some magical girls. 

fenryk:

My piece for the Sailor Moon Tribute Show, Magical Girl Heroines: Sailor Moon and Sailor Senshi! The gallery will take place at Qpop in Little Tokyo on April 5th (this Saturday!) If you’ll be in the Los Angeles area or near it you should check it out :D (A lot of amazing artists!)

fenryk:

My piece for the Sailor Moon Tribute Show, Magical Girl Heroines: Sailor Moon and Sailor Senshi! The gallery will take place at Qpop in Little Tokyo on April 5th (this Saturday!) If you’ll be in the Los Angeles area or near it you should check it out :D (A lot of amazing artists!)

(via transiency)

arabellesicardi:

blackcontemporaryart:

Slave shackles and silverware from Fred Wilson’s exhibition Mining the Museum at the Maryland Historical Society in 1992.

“By titling his installation “Mining the Museum,” the artist set up a three-way pun: excavating the collections to extract the buried presence of racial minorities, planting emotionally explosive historical material to raise consciousness and effect institutional change, and finding reflections of himself within the museum “Où est mon visage?,” reads Wilson’s label accompanying Joshua Johnson’s 19th-century portrait of a white family. An artist of African and Carib Indian ancestry, Wilson identified with Johnson, who was black, and of whom there are no known portrait.
“ Mining the Museum” occupied the entire third floor at MHS, extending through a linked sequence of eight rooms. The wall colors—successively gray, green, red and blue— were components of Wilson’s “palette,” as visitors moved through the “gray” area of  historical truths,  the “green” quarters of human emotions, the “red” environs of slavery and rebellion, and the celestial “blue” spheres of dreams and achievements. [x]

arabellesicardi:

blackcontemporaryart:

Slave shackles and silverware from Fred Wilson’s exhibition Mining the Museum at the Maryland Historical Society in 1992.

By titling his installation “Mining the Museum,” the artist set up a three-way pun: excavating the collections to extract the buried presence of racial minorities, planting emotionally explosive historical material to raise consciousness and effect institutional change, and finding reflections of himself within the museum “Où est mon visage?,” reads Wilson’s label accompanying Joshua Johnson’s 19th-century portrait of a white family. An artist of African and Carib Indian ancestry, Wilson identified with Johnson, who was black, and of whom there are no known portrait.

“ Mining the Museum” occupied the entire third floor at MHS, extending through a linked sequence of eight rooms. The wall colors—successively gray, green, red and blue— were components of Wilson’s “palette,” as visitors moved through the “gray” area of  historical truths,  the “green” quarters of human emotions, the “red” environs of slavery and rebellion, and the celestial “blue” spheres of dreams and achievements. [x]

(via arabellesicardi)

artforadults:

more Adams Carvalho on tumblr 

follow Adams on ffffixas

(via princelawliet)

lissabt:

My two (two!) pieces for the "Magical Girl Heroines: Sailor Moon and Sailor Senshi" gallery show, happening THIS SATURDAY (that’s tomorrow!) at Q-Pop in lovely downtown Los Angeles! The art i’ve already seen for this show looks AMAZING and i’m super pumped to be part of it along with many talented pals and talented potential-future-pals.

(via igniting-sparks)

(Source: elizabeth-colantuoni)

elizabeth-colantuoni:

Flushing

cliobablio:

Magical fighting girls (& cats) this Saturday night at Qpopshop.

(via transiency)

stupidwebsite:

warm room by Fumi Koike

stupidwebsite:

warm room by Fumi Koike

(via danslavoie)

brigettebrigettebrigette:

moon, mars, mercury, venus, jupiter!  

(via cherrylet)