bad girls do it well Cristy, 23, New York City. Hong Kong-Chinese American womanist.
This blog is a collection of the personal, the pretty, and the sociopolitical.
Trigger warning for rape/sexual assault, trans/misogyny, racism, and anti-Blackness.
You can message me via my ask box.
A white man is promoted: He does good work, he deserved it.
A white woman is promoted: Whose dick did she suck?
A man of color is promoted: Oh, great, I guess we have to “fill quotas” now.
A woman of color is promoted: j/k. That never happens.

Accurate as fuck comment (via the-wolfbats)

(Source: keybladeofsteel, via duckindolans)

In the 1930s, men’s nipples were just as provocative, shameful and taboo as women’s are now, and men were protesting in much the same way. In 1930, four men went topless to Coney Island and were arrested. In 1935, a flash mob of topless men descended upon Atlantic City, 42 of whom were arrested. Men fought and they were heard, changing not only laws but social consciousness. And by 1936, men’s bare chests were accepted as the norm.

So why is it that 80 years later women can’t seem to achieve the same for their chests? Why can’t a mother proudly breastfeed her child in public without feeling sexualized? Why is a 17-year-old girl being asked to leave her own prom because a group of fathers find her too provocative?

[…] I am not trying to argue for mandatory toplessness, or even bralessness. What I am arguing for is a woman’s right to choose how she represents her body — and to make that choice based on personal desire and not a fear of how people will react to her or how society will judge her. No woman should be made to feel ashamed of her body.


Scout Willis, in XOJane, on Instagram’s nudity policy and why she recently strolled the NYC streets topless. Solid essay all around. I found this piece particularly interesting because I’d never heard about the men’s nipples thing. (via batmansymbol)

(via homoarigato)

thepeoplesrecord:

Women Artists Visibility Event: The Museum of Modern Art opens but not to women artists, NYC on June 14, 1984
Shot by Clarissa Sligh

Despite the increased visibility of women artists by 1984, most were not included in mainstream gallery or museum exhibitions. When the Museum Of Modern Art opened the exhibition the “International Survey of Painting and Sculpture,” with great fan fare, of the 169 artists chosen, all were white and less than 10 percent were women.

Women artists were incensed. The Women’s Caucus for Art and other women’s groups in the area organized to protest the underrepresentation of women artists.

Included in the photographs are Lucy Lippard, May Stevens, Linda Cunningham, Emma Amos, Sabra Moore, Sharon Jaddis, and Alida Walsh. The posters were pasted all over Soho, a vastly different place from the Soho of today.

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via jeunglongan)

misandry-mermaid:

girlinfourcolors:

moniquill:

marxistfeministsport:

george-blagden-though:

equalaccountability:

mansplainedmarxist:

When I say something that should not be controversial 

Why aren’t 50% of coal miners women? Why not 50% of janitors or pest control workers? Don’t forget front line military!Likewise, why aren’t men 50% of college enrollment and 50% of teachers?
We should eliminate the stupid “personal choice” thing because forcing people into certain professions is way more fun.

THIS IS NOT ABOUT FORCING PEOPLE INTO PROFESSIONSTHIS IS ABOUT WOMEN GOING INTO SCIENCE BEING DISCOURAGEDTHIS IS ABOUT WOMEN BEING DISCRIMINATED AGAINST

FIRST, WHAT GBT SAID.^
SECOND…
FUNNY YOU SHOULD MENTION WOMEN COAL MINERS.  BECAUSE I STUDY THEM.  AND GUESS WHAT?
Women had to fight court cases to be allowed into coal mines as workers.  Once a few women paved the way, thousands of women followed in short suit because on average, their incomes increased 500% over working as domestic workers, doing textile piecework and waitressing.  Some saw their income jump 1000%.  
Dig a little deeper, and you’ll find women have been mining coal for centuries.  They were pushed out in the Victorian period because the mansplainers of the day could tolerate women wielding such a phallic object as a shovel underground with male workers present.  And wearing pants!  Still, women disguised themselves as men to work in the mines.
Oh, and World War II.  Where did all the coal come from then?  Oh, that’s right.  Women.  Women who were expected to stand aside and let the men take their jobs when the war was over and were denied benefits when they later developed black lung.

Also, can we just talk about how absurd it is to say that women don’t make up 50% of ‘janitors’?Gee, I wonder if that’s because when a woman is hired to be the primary cleaner and caretaker of a property, it gets called ‘housekeeping’ or ‘maidservice’ and pays less than the EXACT SAME JOB, which if done by a man is given the title ‘janitor’?

Why aren’t men 50% of college enrollment? Because men aren’t 50% of college applications. No one’s exactly sure why, but the prevailing guess? Because it’s easier for men to get a professional job without a degree. Which means it’s easier for men to earn a living wage without going into debt. Which increases the already existent wealth gap, already exacerbated by the income gap.
(And if you’ll allow me to get all snarkily gender essentialist for a moment, maybe you boys just can’t cut it in higher ed. Even those of you getting into colleges are dropping out at rates WAY higher than women. They were probably just there looking for a wife to provide for them, though, am I right? Ah, get back in the toolshed, don’t worry your silly little heads about it.)

Oh my god I want to fucking marry this entire post.

misandry-mermaid:

girlinfourcolors:

moniquill:

marxistfeministsport:

george-blagden-though:

equalaccountability:

mansplainedmarxist:

When I say something that should not be controversial 

Why aren’t 50% of coal miners women? Why not 50% of janitors or pest control workers? Don’t forget front line military!
Likewise, why aren’t men 50% of college enrollment and 50% of teachers?

We should eliminate the stupid “personal choice” thing because forcing people into certain professions is way more fun.

THIS IS NOT ABOUT FORCING PEOPLE INTO PROFESSIONS
THIS IS ABOUT WOMEN GOING INTO SCIENCE BEING DISCOURAGED
THIS IS ABOUT WOMEN BEING DISCRIMINATED AGAINST

FIRST, WHAT GBT SAID.^

SECOND…

FUNNY YOU SHOULD MENTION WOMEN COAL MINERS.  BECAUSE I STUDY THEM.  AND GUESS WHAT?

Women had to fight court cases to be allowed into coal mines as workers.  Once a few women paved the way, thousands of women followed in short suit because on average, their incomes increased 500% over working as domestic workers, doing textile piecework and waitressing.  Some saw their income jump 1000%.  

Dig a little deeper, and you’ll find women have been mining coal for centuries.  They were pushed out in the Victorian period because the mansplainers of the day could tolerate women wielding such a phallic object as a shovel underground with male workers present.  And wearing pants!  Still, women disguised themselves as men to work in the mines.

Oh, and World War II.  Where did all the coal come from then?  Oh, that’s right.  Women.  Women who were expected to stand aside and let the men take their jobs when the war was over and were denied benefits when they later developed black lung.

Also, can we just talk about how absurd it is to say that women don’t make up 50% of ‘janitors’?
Gee, I wonder if that’s because when a woman is hired to be the primary cleaner and caretaker of a property, it gets called ‘housekeeping’ or ‘maidservice’ and pays less than the EXACT SAME JOB, which if done by a man is given the title ‘janitor’?

Why aren’t men 50% of college enrollment? Because men aren’t 50% of college applications. No one’s exactly sure why, but the prevailing guess? Because it’s easier for men to get a professional job without a degree. Which means it’s easier for men to earn a living wage without going into debt. Which increases the already existent wealth gap, already exacerbated by the income gap.

(And if you’ll allow me to get all snarkily gender essentialist for a moment, maybe you boys just can’t cut it in higher ed. Even those of you getting into colleges are dropping out at rates WAY higher than women. They were probably just there looking for a wife to provide for them, though, am I right? Ah, get back in the toolshed, don’t worry your silly little heads about it.)

Oh my god I want to fucking marry this entire post.

(via moo-ahyou)

hssanya:

Did you know that after they switched to blind auditions, major symphony orchestras hired women between 30% to 55% more? Before bringing in “blind auditions” with a screen to conceal the the candidate, women in the top 5 major orchestras made up less than 5% of the musicians performing.

(via vivanlosancestros)

(Source: what-is-this-fruitsnackery, via biscochozorro)

fanbingblink:

This hashtag is gold.

(via biscochozorro)

  • Microsoft: This E3, we're bringing you 8 more games where you play as a white dude shooting brown people and/or aliens.
  • Ubisoft: What the hell is a "woman"?
  • Nintendo: YOU WANNA PLAY AS ZELDA? YOU CAN PLAY AS ZELDA. YOU WANNA PLAY AS PALUTENA? YOU CAN PLAY AS HER TOO. YOU LIKED MIDNA? SHE'S BACK AS WELL.YOU LIKE COLORFUL GAMES? WE GOT A FUCKTON OF COLORFUL-ASS GAMES. YOU WANT CUTE SQUID GIRLS??!? WE GOT CUTE SQUID GIRLS!!!! YOU WANT OPEN WORLD ZELDA WITH AN ANDROGYNOUS PROTAGONIST THAT MIGHT BE ZELDA? WE FUCKIN GOT THAT TOO.
Perhaps the most widespread myth is the belief that mothers are favored by courts in custody disputes, which stopped being true decades ago. It is true that for roughly the first half of the 1900s the ‘Tender Years Doctrine’ was influential, and mothers had some advantage in gaining custody of young children. (Prior to about 1900, mothers had no rights regarding custody at all.) But in the 1970s the tide was turning back, for various reasons, and by the 1980s fathers were winning at least joint custody in a majority of the custody battles they undertook, and winning sole custody more often than mothers, a situation that remains today. And the fathers who are taking advantage of this imbalance are largely abusive ones; researchers have found that abusers are twice as likely as non-abusive men to seek custody.

[…]

Courts are highly reluctant to curtail fathers’ access to their children. As a number of court employees have said to me over the years, ‘There are so many fathers out there who abandon their children, and here I have a dad who wants to be involved; you’re telling me I should discourage him?’ As a result they tend to hold fathers to much lower standards than mothers. Supervised visitation is not often imposed, and usually gets lifted within a few months as long as the father behaves well under supervisions, as most abusive men do.

Lundy Bancroft in When Dad Hurts Mom: Helping Your Children Heal the Wounds of Witnessing Abuse (2004), pp. 240, 243–44 (via mikroblogolas)

(via bad-dominicana)

killsmedead:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:
1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”
2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”
3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”
4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

#the problem is not that women overall are any more confusing than men #it is that the men who tend to think of women as monolithic are also the men who are stupid

killsmedead:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:

1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”

2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”

3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”

4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

 

(Source: ethiopienne, via everythingisacasestudy)

Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.

Sylvia Plath

fuck every single time that last line gets quoted without the rest

(via the-smurf-on-fire)

(Source: raccoonwounds, via vivanlosancestros)

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

theroguefeminist:

winehouses:

As executive editor, Abramson’s starting salary in 2011 was $475,000, compared to Keller’s salary that year, $559,000. Her salary was raised to $503,000, and — only after she protested — was raised again to $525,000. She learned that her salary as managing editor, $398,000, was less than that of a male managing editor for news operations, John Geddes. She also learned that her salary as Washington bureau chief, from 2000 to 2003, was a hundred thousand dollars less than that of her predecessor in that position, Phil Taubman.

stay slimy, NYT

ha ha fuck the new york times

fuck all these old journalist establishments. they’re all sexist, racist and bullshit. just perish. you’re already heading that way

whoops! this is so fucking funny to me right now. And I wonder what the new editor is being paid cause he is a Black man as far as I have read and they pay Black men less than White men AND White women so. 

(via everythingisacasestudy)

Men and women differ in their language patterns; for example, research suggests that men interrupt women more than women do men (a finding that surprises most men but not most women).

Analyzing English Grammar, Klammer, Schulz, & Della Volpe, p. 21

you guys my grammar book is sassy

(via lattaite)

new goal: interrupt men I don’t like at every possible opportunity

(via flowersandfemme)

last week i facilitated an activity for a workshop in which everyone in the room would be timed to have 1 minute to speak, answer a question, etc. unsurprisingly, most women in the room spoke for way less than a minute and the men in the room spoke for more than a minute and were extremely angry at me for ruthlessly cutting them off.

(via tranqualizer)

(Source: katyrex, via tranqualizer)

ethiopienne:

Being a Black girl means having to second guess yourself when you want to speak up against dangerous Black male patriarchy because you know Black men are already viewed as violent and savage in the white supremacist social climate of the West.

Being a Black girl means being told you have to choose between your gender and your race—and not being able to explain why that’s impossible.

Being a Black girl means being told you’re simultaneously hypersexual and undesirable—and if you get assaulted, it’s because you were a ho.

Being a Black girl means being expected to explain all of this over and over and over, calmly and coolly and without blaming anyone or pointing any fingers or having the audacity to raise your voice—even though people will call you Angry(TM) regardless of your tone.

Being a Black girl means being silenced.

(Source: ethiopienne, via moo-ahyou)

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

(via solaceames)