bad girls do it well Cristy, 23, New York City. Hong Kong-Chinese American womanist. Cis girl, she/her/hers.
This blog is a collection of the personal, the pretty, and the sociopolitical.
Trigger warning for rape/sexual assault, trans/misogyny, racism, and anti-Blackness.
You can message me via my ask box.

bustysaintclair:

meowdypurrtner:

its really important for men to stand up to other men who say terrible and sexist shit

because sexist men dont listen to what women have to say

literally the most important thing men can do if they want to call themselves feminist allies 

(via duckindolans)

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

(via vergible-woods)

…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious.
Sophie Heawood (via hereticnarrative)

(Source: featherfall, via caprediem)

You know what else it costs to write about and talk about consent? I’m going to be super real with y’all. It has cost me the vast majority of my relationships with men. Not all at once, but eventually, over time, one by one. It was one sexist joke too many, it was one boundary-crossing-creep-defender over the line. It was the constant microaggressions or the combination of being privileged and defensive about it and unable or unwilling to do any better. Most grew weary of arguing about feminist issues, or about the fact that I wouldn’t let them just win those arguments, even though they usually had no idea what they were talking about. They couldn’t deal with the fact that I won’t allow anyone to say disparaging shit to and about me and mine. Or they won’t or can’t do better after I explain how to do better many many times and finally I have to peace out on them for my own safety. I have at present a tiny handful of guy friends. One I get into arguments with nearly every time we talk. I fear that relationship may go the way of most of my past relationships with subtly sexist men—away, that is to say. Which is really too fucking bad. Because the truth is, I don’t hate men—I hate male privilege. I really like men, shit, I love them actually, some of them. I miss having men friends, but not enough to let the mild misogyny slide. I have got to take care of me and mine. That’s where we clash, because I refuse to just smooth things over, to just let things go. They’re accustomed to deference and I’ve taught myself to drop that habit as best I can.
Guest Post: On the costs of talking about consent - Consent Culture (via ceeainthereforthat)

(via bad-dominicana)

dope-girlzilla:

dynastylnoire:

stayxsvckaxfree:

From the Strolling Series by Cecile Emeke

free condoms; pay for tampons, typecasting, “selling out”, rape culture & more

I love this series, and everything she said completely resonated with me, especially when she talked about how black men (#FakeDeeps, as Cecile cleverly put it) contribute to sexism towards black women. I think it’s important that feminism places women as central to the cause, and I loved how she spoke from her who point of view as a black women. 

The Filmaker’s Info 

Website: cecileemeke.com
Vimeo: vimeo.com/cecileemeke
FB: facebook.com/cecileemeke
Tumblr: cecileemeke.tumblr.com
Instagram: @cecileemeke
Twitter: @cecileemeke

exposing the ankhs

I love these!!! Keep em coming

In a study of children aged 2-5, parents interrupted their daughters more than their sons, and fathers were more likely to talk simultaneously with their children than mothers were. Jennifer Coates says: “It seems that fathers try to control conversation more than mothers…and both parents try to control conversation more with daughters than with sons. The implicit message to girls is that they are more interruptible and that their right to speak is less than that of boys’.”

Girls’ and boys’ differing understanding of when to talk, when to be quiet, what is polite and so on, has a visible impact on the dynamics of the classroom. Just as men dominate the floor in business meetings, academic conferences and so on, so little boys dominate in the classroom—and little girls let them.


X  (via albinwonderland)

Working with children for over a decade, this is something I’ve noticed, actually. And for the majority, the little girls in my class and my co-worker’s classes all sit quietly and listen MUCH better than the boys do. Most boys don’t care to be quiet and sit still. And I don’t think this is an attribute of boys being “rowdier” or more “hyper” - believe me, the girls are JUST as off the wall as the boys if you aren’t telling them not to. It must be a learned behavior, and it must be enforced more with the girls so they know they can’t get away with it. You have no idea how many times in my career I’ve heard “boys will be boys,” and smiling parents as they tell me with a laugh, sorry, their son is “wild” and a “handful” as they introduce him to the class.

(via voicelikehelvetica)

And that’s how you do sexism.  That’s how it’s so effectively trained into every single citizen and indoctrinated as normal and right.

(via waltzy)

(Source: geviladaheel, via clickbreatheclick)

vanillaandlavender:

dion-thesocialist:

nineteencallme:

dolorimeter:

woody allen, the irredeemable creep whose obvious misogyny was misinterpreted as creative genius by the college-boy mentality. 

    ~fionaapple

trash

(Source: mfjr, via bad-dominicana)

In the United States, access to tampons and pads for low-income women is a real problem, too: food stamps don’t cover feminine hygiene products, so some women resort to selling their food stamps in order to pay for “luxuries” like tampons. Women in prison often don’t have access to sanitary products at all, and the high cost of a product that half the population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply, well, bullshit.

The case for free tampons (via stuffmomnevertoldyou)

You know, I don’t think I’ve ever heard anybody suggest that toilet paper or paper towels in public bathrooms shouldn’t be free.  We’d consider it outrageous if that very basic necessity were to be missing, or provided only for purchase.

And yet.

(via animatedamerican)

(via vivanlosancestros)

"But women get unfair advantages in custody battles"

handaxe:

FALSE. Fathers who ask for sole custody are far more likely to get it. It’s just that they don’t ask, mostly women do. Men win custody over women even if they are ostensibly unfit. More and more, judges and parents rule in favor of 50/50 custody. In fact, in the past ten years, the men’s rights movement has been devastating to women seeking custody in court and women are awarded sole custody about half as many times as men.  

So find a new fucking myth. 

(via clickbreatheclick)

I don’t know what asshole invented the idea that teenage girls are the cause for all evil, but I really hope that person never has to raise one. I don’t want him to see her dissolve in his fingers as society tells her to eat less, be thinner, be the damsel in distress, be something for a man to fix, be different but not too different, be special but never ever a special snowflake—I don’t want him to watch as she realizes that no matter what she loves, she’ll be made fun of for it. She can simply like her coffee from Starbucks and suddenly she’s vapid and thinks herself poetic. She’ll want to play video games but be called a fake nerd, particularly if she poses in any remotely flirtatious way because for some reason despite the entire community playing games with poorly dressed women they still hate it when a real girl wears less clothing, she will be seen as trespassing in a specifically male space—but when she falls in love with a female-based television show for children, she’ll watch as men step on themselves to sexualize it. If she wants old-fashioned romance she’s seen as being naive but at the same time is told to keep herself ‘pure’ for some dude that might not hurt her. If she admits to being anything, she makes herself a target. She will be told her worth is based on how much a man values her. She might love to cook but she’ll hate being asked to stay in the kitchen, she might love to read but get told she’s too introverted by half the population and ‘not that special’ by the other. If she loves to go out and party, she’s ‘just another college co-ed,’ if she loves to spend her Friday nights watching anime, she’s a shut-in. God forbid she be proud of something: the words “I’m different from other girls” are a death sentence because we live in a society that doesn’t want to see women like that, a society that doesn’t like the idea maybe we all are actually different and not carbon copies of each other, maybe we all would like to feel unique and loved and worth knowing—maybe the real problem is that she will be raised to believe being a girl means silicone and Photoshop and dying as a way to move forwards a plot—and she doesn’t want to be seen as that. When she says “I’m not like other girls,” she means she’s not like the girls she sees on TV, these invented two-dimensional creatures that say one line and then get chased down by monsters.

She can try all she likes. She’ll be shut down at every single fucking turn. What she doesn’t know is that they’re getting her ready for when she’s grown up because she’ll be so used to being stepped on she’ll just give up. Why respect women when you don’t even respect little girls?

And when she is burning up, when she mentions that her insides are volcanoes and her skin is too thin to contain them: she will be told she is hysterical, that she’s doing it for attention.

I don’t want him to watch as she shuts down, as she learns to live as a paradox, I don’t want him to see her rip herself to shreds in order to be perfect, I don’t want him to realize that there’s no way she’ll get help because she’s only doing what she’s told.


Teenage girls aren’t the downfall of society, society is the downfall of teenage girls. /// r.i.d (via inkskinned)
People don’t wanna be compared to the teenage girl; the teenage girl is hated, teenage girls hate themselves. If you listen to a certain kind of music, or if you express your emotions in a certain kind of way, if you self harm, you write diaries, all those kind of activities are sort of laughed at and ridiculed because they’re associated with being a teenage girl. Even just things like being cripplingly self-conscious or overly concerned with our appearance, that’s considered like a teenage girl thing and therefore it’s ridiculous, it’s stupid, it’s not relevant or legitimate, and you know, what we needed at that age was legitimisation and respect and support but all we got was dismissal and “oh you’re such a teenage girl.”
Feminism, Education, and the plight of the teenage girl  (via americanpeaches)

(Source: lesbolution, via moo-ahyou)

Annie (a pseudonym) is a Chinese-American, straight, female university professor. While she was in graduate school, she found it difficult to receive medical treatment due to the perceived psychiatric condition of simply being Asian and female: “I went to a doctor at the university because I had recurring abdominal pain. The doctor listened to my description, but rather than doing a physical exam, he explained to me that it was normal for Asian women to be anxious and stressed out, and anxiety was probably causing my abdominal pain.” But surprisingly, the doctor didn’t treat the anxiety either. He just said there was nothing he could do.
Shattering the Madness Monolith: On the Intersections of Race, Gender, and Psychiatric Disability (via andromedalogic)

(Source: longmoreinstituteondisability, via duckindolans)

A white man is promoted: He does good work, he deserved it.
A white woman is promoted: Whose dick did she suck?
A man of color is promoted: Oh, great, I guess we have to “fill quotas” now.
A woman of color is promoted: j/k. That never happens.

Accurate as fuck comment (via the-wolfbats)

(Source: keybladeofsteel, via duckindolans)

In the 1930s, men’s nipples were just as provocative, shameful and taboo as women’s are now, and men were protesting in much the same way. In 1930, four men went topless to Coney Island and were arrested. In 1935, a flash mob of topless men descended upon Atlantic City, 42 of whom were arrested. Men fought and they were heard, changing not only laws but social consciousness. And by 1936, men’s bare chests were accepted as the norm.

So why is it that 80 years later women can’t seem to achieve the same for their chests? Why can’t a mother proudly breastfeed her child in public without feeling sexualized? Why is a 17-year-old girl being asked to leave her own prom because a group of fathers find her too provocative?

[…] I am not trying to argue for mandatory toplessness, or even bralessness. What I am arguing for is a woman’s right to choose how she represents her body — and to make that choice based on personal desire and not a fear of how people will react to her or how society will judge her. No woman should be made to feel ashamed of her body.


Scout Willis, in XOJane, on Instagram’s nudity policy and why she recently strolled the NYC streets topless. Solid essay all around. I found this piece particularly interesting because I’d never heard about the men’s nipples thing. (via batmansymbol)

(via homoarigato)

thepeoplesrecord:

Women Artists Visibility Event: The Museum of Modern Art opens but not to women artists, NYC on June 14, 1984
Shot by Clarissa Sligh

Despite the increased visibility of women artists by 1984, most were not included in mainstream gallery or museum exhibitions. When the Museum Of Modern Art opened the exhibition the “International Survey of Painting and Sculpture,” with great fan fare, of the 169 artists chosen, all were white and less than 10 percent were women.

Women artists were incensed. The Women’s Caucus for Art and other women’s groups in the area organized to protest the underrepresentation of women artists.

Included in the photographs are Lucy Lippard, May Stevens, Linda Cunningham, Emma Amos, Sabra Moore, Sharon Jaddis, and Alida Walsh. The posters were pasted all over Soho, a vastly different place from the Soho of today.

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via jeunglongan)